Category : Patent Policy

Recently the Dutch financial newspaper "Het Financiele Dagblad" spent an article (" ("spin-offs rely on deep pockets University holding") on how (un)successful Dutch universities have been with their academic spin-offs, how many have been able to actually provide enough starting capital to give the spin-off a head start? How many universities only provide advice, but no capital? Some universities have set up special Holding companies to hold the shares (or part of it) in the spin-off, provide licenses under the academic inventions in patents necessary to operate the spin-off or simple act as a business advisory to the newly set

Author: 11 months ago

Most innovative businesses provide rewards and some form of recognition to inventors. There are two main reasons for having a reward and recognition program in place for inventors. Firstly in certain jurisdictions there are legal requirements to take into consideration, like e.g. Germany. Secondly and more importantly, a good comprehensive reward and recognition program encourages and motivates innovation and creativity. The components of a reward and recognition program may include such elements as financial awards, plaques, patent festivals or celebrations, all giving the inventor recognition by Senior Management. Additionally top inventors can be recognized with exclusive get-togethers and published of league

Author: 1 year ago

The International Licensing Platform Vegetable Association (ILP) was founded on 13 November 2014 with the aim of improving the worldwide access to and use of plant traits. The platform applies exclusively to vegetable varieties. On the same day, the background to the ILP, including the story behind its formation and its scope, was a central topic at the symposium called ‘Breeding and Protecting, access to plant-related patents’ (Veredelen en Beschermen, toegang tot plant gerelateerde octrooien) which was organized in Wageningen by Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO) and the Board for Plant Varieties. In this article, we will first consider several general characteristics

Author: 1 year ago

This article appeared in a publication commemorating the 100 year existence of the Dutch "Patent Act 1910", published by the Netherlands Patent Office ("Octrooicentrum Nederland") in 2010 by Severin de Wit It is not generally known that the Patent Act 1910 marked the end of an era in which no patent legislation existed. A major feature of the latter half of nineteenth-century Europe was that of an anti-patent sentiment, but it was primarily in the Netherlands that it actually gained a foothold.1 In 1864, the whole industrial sector presented a petition to the King, requesting that the current patent system, which

Author: 2 years ago

How Nokia’s smartphone software strategy failed and ultimately killed the brand. Much has been written about the ups and downs of the cellular / mobile phone industry over the past 25 years, and particularly the smartphone industry in more recent times. There seems to be a rule in this particular sector that the leading companies eventually lose their positions – often quickly and brutally. Mobile phone champion Nokia, one of Europe’s biggest technology success stories, was no exception, losing its market share in the space of just a few years. In 1999, one in every three phones sold in the world was

Author: 2 years ago

IP-centric businesses whose shares trade on the public markets come in many shapes and sizes — some are better suited for return than others. Many of the most interesting IP-rich businesses, from an investor perspective, are publicly traded, thinly capitalized companies with experienced management. The best have a realistic view of their IP assets, usually patents, and the timing and cost of their disputes and value of potential licenses. The emergence of public IP-rich companies (PIPCOs) whose shares trade on the global exchanges is presenting new opportunities for patent holders and investors alike. They are the subject of the next (March) Intangible Investor, “PIPCOs – A Business Model Whose Time

Author: 2 years ago

Technology transfer of new ideas and innovation from universities and research institutes into society is a major source of Europe’s “knowledge economy”. However, EU firms are struggling to better exploit public-funded research (like those from universities) and transform their findings into patents and innovations that generate growth.  Barriers to collaboration between the public and private sectors exist, in particular when it comes to sharing revenues and costs. European law on how to deal with inventions made by university professors and whether they can be commercialized (and if so, against what conditions) is fragmented. The practices among European universities is diverse and

Author: 2 years ago

In the 2014, volume 3 edition of the "Journal of Intellectual Property Law and Management" an article is published by IPEG's managing partner, Severin de Wit, called "Challenges in Public and Private Domains will shape the Future of Intellectual Property". The Journal is published by the National Taipei University of Technology (“NTUT”),  a national university located in Taipei City, Taiwan. The Journal is run by the Institute of Intellectual Property, an educational organization of the NTUT. Summary: Market failures, troubled access to medicine, impediments to free flow of information, copyright over-extension, digital right protection, overkill and patents stifling rather than stimulating innovation

Author: 2 years ago

By naming former Google IP Chief Michelle Lee Deputy Director the Obama administration has tipped the patent scales in favor of tech businesses with special interests. In the absence of a named Director for over a year, naming Michelle Lee as Deputy effective January 13 will make her the Office’s highest ranking executive. Ordinarily this would not cause a stir, but Google is not a typical technology company. It is vehemently anti-patent, opposed to broad range patents and holders. The company has spent tens of millions of dollars lobbying the Congress and the White House for weaker innovation rights. Google makes

Author: 3 years ago